LSD options ND0 box?

Discussion in 'Mechanical - Engine, Gearbox, Exhaust etc' started by maece82, Oct 15, 2018.

  1. Is the Quaife LSD the only one available for an ND0 gearbox in a MKII Mégane 225?

    I'm on the way to rebuild a box and would like to install a lsd.

    Many thanks
    Marcel
     
  2. Quaife is the cheapest option really, you can get a gripper or i think there is another one.
    Or you can get an old R26 box and take one from that, 225 and R26 box's are the same

     
  3. A Quaiffe worked really well on the track in my 225 but I’ve just ordered a Gripper to replace the helical LSD in my Trophy R as I get wheel spin when my driving isn’t up to scratch (which is often).

    There is also Drexler as an option for a clutch pack diff.
     
    -Jamie- and timbo like this.
  4. Drexler, that was the other one i was thinking of :laughing:
     
  5. Hey, I'm interested in learning more about these LSDs. Can anyone give a brief description of the differences between the 250 LSD & 265 275 (is the 265 275 LSD more aggressive?), as well as aftermarket LSDs like Drexler, Gripper and Quaiffe?
    Thanks,
    Andy
     
  6. Commenting for research reasons as this will be my Christmas job
     
  7. matt e

    matt e South East RSM Area Rep

    Quaife doesnt need rebuilding like the gripper every so often, i think
     
  8. This article provides a good basic overview between the different types of LSDs (it does have some technical errors but it's easy to read): http://www.trak-life.com/basic-intr...us-mechanical-limited-slip-differentials-lsd/

    Quaife is helical whereas both the Gripper and Drexler are mechanical or clutch-pack diffs. A helical diff will still spin an unloaded wheel whereas a mechanical diff will continue to power the loaded wheel even if one wheel is unloaded.
     
    -Jamie- likes this.
  9. Perfect, many thanks for this technical input!

    Price wise, there might be quite a difference indeed. But Gripper might be a way to go, with a mild setup...

    Quaife is the less cheapest and Drexler might be the most advanced/hightech one...but for road use to much, I think...
     
  10. -Jamie-

    -Jamie- RSM Moderator

    For road use and light track the stock diff is more than upto the job.

    It's only with heavy track use that it starts to show its flaws due to it being a helical type diff. I'd like a plated doff like a gripper in mine at somepoint
     
  11. Given the choice as this is my winter project. PH1 225

    would you fit r26 box or rebuild mine with quaife?

    I intend to fit ttv with r26r clutch

    Car is used for fast road, track days, ring and hillclimbs/sprints
     

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